Laboratoire méditerranéen de préhistoire Europe Afrique Lampea

Laboratoire méditerranéen de préhistoire Europe Afrique
Lampea, UMR 7269


Partenaires

CNRS


Rechercher

 
Directeur de l'unité
Jean-Pierre Bracco

Directeurs adjoints
Estelle Herrscher
Xavier Margarit


LAMPEA (UMR 7269) MMSH
BP 647
5 rue du Château de l'Horloge
13094 Aix-en-Provence
Cedex 2
33 (0) 442 52 42 94
barnier@mmsh.univ-aix.fr

Maion méditerranéenne des sciences de l'homme

Accueil > Projets & Prix > Projets PEPS

PEPS - AMPOP

AMPOP

Alimentation et mobilité des populations préhispaniques de Tablada de Lurín (IIe s. BC-IIe s. AD, Lima, Pérou) : continuité ou rupture ?

Diet in Peru’s pre-Hispanic central coast

Project funded by PEPS — INEE 2012 (CNRS, France), by Asociación Atocongo, and by Santander International Travel Grants (Bournemouth University).

The team

Dr Goude Gwenaëlle
CNRS researcher
Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, Minist Culture & Com, LAMPEA UMR 7269, Aix-en-Provence, France

Dr Karina Gerdau-Radonic
Senior Lecturer, Bournemouth University
Faculty of Science and Technology, UK
http://staffprofiles.bournemouth.ac.uk/display/kgradonic

Prof. Krzysztof Makowski
Faculty of Literature and Human Sciences
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Lima, Peru
http://www.pucp.edu.pe/profesor/krzysztof-makowski-hanula/

Prof. Holger Schutkowski
Bournemouth University
Faculty of Science and Technology, UK
http://staffprofiles.bournemouth.ac.uk/display/hschutkowski

Mrs. Pamela Castro de la Mata
Archaeologist
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Lima, Peru

M. Guy André
CNRS Engineer, Archaeology
Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, Minist Culture & Com, LAMPEA UMR 7269, Aix-en-Provence, France

The project

Our work focused on the diet, environment, and geographical origin of two human groups buried in the Tablada de Lurín necropolis (2nd cent. BC - 2nd cent. AD ; Lima, Peru). The project tested archaeological hypotheses based on material culture by contrasting the cultural evidence with biological data. Tablada is characterized by two distinct phases of occupation which evidence a clear rupture in burial patterns. Moreover, based on ceramic evidence and the lack of habitation sites in immediate proximity to the cemetery, both burial populations seem to stem from a certain distance from the site (ca. 20 km) and that they were turned toward land rather than marine resources despite Tablada’s close proximity to the ocean. With archeological, anthropological, and paleoenvironmental data, this study aimed to understand both population’s dietary habits and geographic origins and evaluate whether these shed any light on the cultural rupture revealed by the change in burial practices.

Sampling was performed on 49 individuals and 11 faunal remains from different species available on the site. For the first occupation phase we selected long bones of 10 women, 10 men, 10 juveniles (>4 years old) and 9 non-human species. For the second phase, biological information, such as sex and age, was limited on the individuals buried in collective deposits. Thus, we preferentially selected innominate fragments where possible ; 8 women, 2 men, 2 juveniles (>4 years old), 6 non sexed individuals and 2 non-human species were chosen. From these individuals, 20 from phase 1 were available for sampling on the root dentin of the second molar (including also 3 individuals for crown enamel) and 6 from phase 2 on the second molars (including 1 individual for crown enamel). For non-human species ,only bone remains were studied as these were the most abundant. Moreover, to interpret the results, environmental data (zooarchaeology, palaeobotany) was included as well ; in order to complete the environmental series, modern samples of various local fruit and vegetables (C3 and C4 plants), fish, and meat.were also analysed.

Results highlighted the very poor preservation of all the material, and only a few samples were retained to interpret the isotopic data : 9 for collagen and 9 for apatite. Our bone and tooth archaeological material is smaller than most of the series previously published. However, a drastic selection of samples was necessary when considering the preservation state and relevance of results. This multi-element and multi-tissue study proposes for the first time a Peruvian paleaodietary investigation combining usual isotopic data with sulphur data and with modern samples results. Even if only a few individuals, particularly from phase 2, have been included in the discussion, this study supports more complex dietary and mobility patterns than initially assumed from archaeological material. Fish and maize constitute the staple foods, however, proportions seem to vary between individuals without the possibility to establish for the meantime a relationship with other biological or archaeological data.

Results also show the necessity to establish a further isotopic baseline and isoscape in the region, specifically for sulphur, and the importance of sampling selection, trying to combine the type of bone (more thick cortical) with individual biological information. The questions now raised should be conducted on a wider sample size (a very large selection of individuals mainly from phase 1) focusing on including more biological information for comparison and analysis. The possibility of using enamel for apatite analyses should be also considered.

Acknowledgements

The research team thanks Iso-Analytical Ltd. (Crewe, UK), J. Ughetto and M. Balasse (SSIMM MNHN UMR 7209, Paris, France) for their availability and services, the staff and students of Pachacámac Valley Program (before Lomas de Lurín), Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú for their help and support, and the Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Antropología e Historia del Perú (Pueblo Libre, Lima, Peru) as well as the Ministerio de Cultura (Lima, Peru) for the research and export permit. Samples were exported from Peru and analysed under permit no. 057-DGPC-VMPCIC-MC (Resolución Directorial del Ministerio de Cultura, Peru).

Dissemination

- K. Gerdau-Radonic, G. Goude, P. Castro de la Mata, G. André, H. Schutkowski, K. Makowski, 2015. Diet in Peru’s pre-Hispanic central coast. Journal of Archaeological Science : Reports, 4 : 371-386. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2015.09.016
- K. Gerdau-Radonic, G. Goude, P. Castro de la Mata, G. André, K. Makowski, H. Schutkowski 2013. Cultural Replacement and Diet in Peru’s Prehispanic Central Coast. Abstract. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 150 (S56) : 128.
- K. Gerdau-Radonic, G. Goude, P. Castro de la Mata, G. André, K. Makowski, H. Schutkowski, “Cultural Replacement and Diet in Peru’s Prehispanic Central Coast”. Annual Conference of the American Association of Physical Anthropology (9-13 April Knoxville, USA 2011), Podium.
- K. Gerdau-Radonic, G. Goude, P. Castro de la Mata, G. André, K. Makowski, H. Schutkowski, “Cultural Replacement and Diet in Peru’s Prehispanic Central Coast”. 15th Annual Conference of the British Association for Biological Anthropology and Osteoarchaeology, 13th to 15th of September 2013, University of York, Podium.